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A04651 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Vaughan, Robert, engraver.
Ben: Ionson's execration against Vulcan· VVith divers epigrams by the same author to severall noble personages in this kingdome. Never published before.; Execration against Vulcan
Printed by J. O[kes] for Iohn Benson [and A. Crooke], and are to be sold at his shop at St. Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet-streete, London : 1640.
t there be a starry Robe Of Constillations 'bout her hurl'd, And thou hast painted beauties world. But Painter see you doe not sell A Coppy of this Piece, nor tell VVhose 'tis: but if it favour finde, Next sitting wee will draw her minde. B. Jonson. Her Minde. PAynter y'are come, but may be gone, Now I have better thought thereon, This worke I can performe alone, And give you reasons more than one, Not that your Art I doe refuse, But here I may no Colours use; Besides your hand will never hit To draw the thing that cannot sit. You could make shift to paint an eye, An Eagle towring in the skye, A Sun, a Sea, a Sandlesse pit, And these are like a Minde, not it. No, to expresse this Mind to sence, Would aske a heavens intelligence, Since that the sence, But that a minde so rapt so high, So swift, so pure should yet apply It selfe to us, and come so nigh Earths grossenesse, there's the how, and why? Is it because it sees us dull And stuck in Clay here, it would pull Vs forth by some Coelestiall slight, Vp to her owne sublimed height? Or hath shee here upon the ground, Some Paradise or Pallace found In all the bounds of Beauty fit For her t'inhabite? there is it. Thrice happy house that hast receite, For this so softly forme, so straite, So polish'd, perfect, and so even, As it slid moulded out of Heaven. Not swelling like the Ocean proud, But stooping gently as a Cloud, As smooth as Oyle powr'd forth, and calme As showres, and sweet as drops of Balme, Smooth, soft, and sweet, an
A12034 Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Marshall, William, fl. 1617-1650, engraver.
Poems: vvritten by Wil. Shake-speare. Gent
By Tho. Cotes, and are to be sold by Iohn Benson, dwelling in St. Dunstans Church-yard, Printed at London : 1640.
, And let there be a starry Robe, Of Constillations bout her hurl'd, And thou hast painted beauties world. But Painter see you doe not sell A coppy of this Peece, nor tell Whose tis: But if it favour finde. Next sitting we will draw her minde. B. L. Her minde. PAinter y'are come, but may be gone, Now I have better thought thereon, This worke I can performe alone, And give you reasons more than one. Not that your Art I doe refuse, But here I may no colours use, Besides your hand will never hit To draw the thing that cannot sit. You could make shift to paint an eye, An Eagle towring in the skie, A Sunne, a Sea, a Sandlesse pit, And these are like a minde, not it. No, to expresse this minde to sence, Would aske a heavens intelligence, Since th sence, But that a minde so rapt so high, So swift, so pure should yet apply It selfe to us, and come so igh Earths grossenesse, there's the how, and why? Is it because it sees us dull And stucke in clay here? it would pull V forth by some Coelestiall slight, Vp to her owne sublimed height? Or hath shee here upon the ground, Some Paradise or Pallace found In all the bounds of Beauty fit For hert' in habit? there is it. Thrice happie house that hast receite, For this so softly forme, so strai e, So polish'd, perfect, and so even, As it slid moulded out of heaven. Not swelling like the Ocean proud, But stooping gently as a Cloud, As smooth as Oyle powr'd forth, and calme, As showers, and sweete as droppes of Balme, Smooth, soft, and sweete, a
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
hearts, But, in a calme, and god-like vnitie, Preserues communitie. O, who is he, that (in this peace) enioyes Th'Elixir of all ioyes? A forme more fresh, then are the Eden bowers And lasting, as her flowers: Richer then Time, and as Time's vertue, rare. Sober, as saddest care: A sixed thought, an eye vn-taught to glance; Who (blest with such high chance) Would, at suggestion of a steepe desire, Cast himselfe from the spire Of all his happinesse? But soft: I heare Some vicious foole draw neare, That cryes, we dreame, and sweares, there's no such thing, As this chaste loue we sing. Peace Luxurie, thou art like one of those Who, being at sea, suppose, Because they moue, the continent doth so: No, vice, we let thee know Though thy wild thoughts with sparrowes wings doe flye, Turtles can chastly dye; And yet (in this t'expresse our selues more cleare) We doe not number, here, Such spirits as are onely continent, Because lust's meanes are spent: Or those, who doubt the common mouth of fame, And for their place, and name, Cannot so safely sinne. Their chastitie Is meere necessitie.
A18592 Chester, Robert, 1566-1640. Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. aut Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. aut Chapman, George, 1559?-1634. aut Marston, John, 1575?-1634. aut
The anuals [sic] of great Brittaine. Or, A most excellent monument wherein may be seene all the antiquities of this kingdome, to the satisfac ion both of the vniuersities, or any other place stirred with emulation of long continuance. Excellently figured out in a worthy poem.; Loves martyr
Printed [by E. Allde] for Mathew Lownes, London : 1611.
erent harts, B t in a calme and God-like vnitie, Preserues Communitie. O who is he that (in this peace) enioyes Th' Elixir of all ioyes? (A Forme more fresh then are the Eden bowers, And lasting as her flowers: Richer then Time, and as Times Vertue, are, Sober, as saddest Care, A fixed Thought, an Eye vntaught to glance;) Who (blest with such high chance) Would at suggestion of a steepe Desire, Cast himselfe from the spire Of all his Happinesse? But soft: I heare Some vicious Foole draw neare, That cries we dreame; and sweares, there's no such thing As this chaste Loue we sing. Peace Luxurie, thou art like one of those Who (being at sea) suppose Because they moue, the Continent doth so: No (Vice) we let thee know, Though thy wild Thoughts with Sparrowes wings do flie, "Turtles can chastly die; And yet (in this t'expresse our selfe more cleare) We do not number here Such Spirites as are onely continent, Because Lusts meanes are spent: Or those, who doubt the common mouth of Fame, And for their Place, or Name, Cannot so safely sinne; Their Chastitie Is meere Necessitie, Nor m
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A00694 Ferrabosco, Alfonso, ca. 1575-1628.
Lessons for 1.2. and 3. viols. By Alfonso Ferrabosco
Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Iohn Brovvne, and are to be sould at his shop in Saint Dunstanes Church-yard in Fleetstreet, London : 1609.
oe an act of Nature and Iuſtice. For their ſeale, they had it in the Mint, or not at all: Howſoeuer, if they want it, I will eaſe my ſelfe the vice of commendation. Alfonſo Ferraboſco. TO MY EXCELLENT FRIEND, ALFONSO FERRABOSCO. WHen we doe giue, Alfonſo, to the light A worke of ours, we part with our owne right. For then, all mouthes will iudge; and their owne way: The Learn'd haue no more priuiledge, then the Lay. And, though we could all men, all cenſures heare, We ought not giue them taſte, we had an eare: For, if the humerous World will talke, at large, They ſhould be fooles, for me, at their owne charge. Say, this, or that man they to thee preferre; Euen thoſe, for whom they doe this, know they erre: And would (being ask'd the truth) aſhamed ſay, They were not to be nam'd, on the ſame day. Then ſtand vnto thy ſelfe, nor ſeeke without For Fame, with breath ſoone kindled, ſoone blowneout. Ben: Ionſon. Jn lode dell'arte, & dell' Authore, SONETTO. S'Ogni arte tanto piu da noi s'apprezza, Quanto ha piu nobil ſenſo per oggetto, & quanto n'e peu degno il ſoggetto, Ʋince
A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
hence call'd harmonie: I, yet, had vtter'd nothing on thy part, When these were but the praises of the Art. But when I haue said, the proofes of all these bee Shed in thy Songs; 'tis true: but short of thee. CXXXI. TO THE SAME. WHen we doe giue, ALPHONSO, to the light, A worke of ours, we part with our owne right; For, then, all mouthes will iudge, and their owne way: The learn'd haue no more priuiledge, then the lay. And though we could all men, all censures heare, We ought not giue them taste, we had an eare. For, if the hum'rous world will talke at large, They should be fooles, for me, at their owne charge. Say, this, or that man they to thee preferre; Euen those for whom they doe this, know they erre: And would (being ask'd the truth) ashamed say, They were not to be nam'd on the same day. Then stand vnto thy selfe, not seeke without For fame, with breath soone kindled, soone blowne out. CXXXII. TO Mr. IOSVAH SYLVESTER. IF to admire were to commend my praise Might then both thee, thy worke and merit raise: But, as it is (the Child of Ignorance, And vtter stranger
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A04636 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
The alchemist. VVritten by Ben. Ionson
Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Walter Burre, and are to be sold by Iohn Stepneth, at the west-end of Paules, London : 1612.
mens Planets, And their good Angels, and their bad. SVB. I doe If I doe see'hem. FAC. VVhat! my honest Abel? Thou art well met, here. DRV. Troth, Sir, I was speaking, Iust, as your VVorship came here, of your VVorship. I pray you, speake for me to Mr. Doctor. FAC. He shall doe any thing. Doctor, doe you heare? This is my friend, Abel, an honest fellow, He lets me haue good Tobacco, and he do's not Sophisticate it, with Sack-lees, or Oyle, Nor washes it in Muscadell, and Graines, Nor buries it, in grauell, vnder ground, Wrap'd vp in greasie leather, or piss'd cloutes: But keepes it in fine Lilly-pots, that open'd, Smell like conserue of Roses, or French Beanes. He has his Maple block, his siluer tongs, Winchester pipes, and fire of Iuniper. A neate, spruce-honest-fellow, and no Goldmith. SVB. H'is a fortunate fellow, that I am sure on. FAC. Already, Sir, ha'you found it? Lo'thee Abel! SVB. And, in right way to'ward riches. FAC. Sir. SVB. This Summer. He will be of the Clothing of his company. And, next spring, call'd to the Scar
A66801unknown? Kirkman, Francis, 1632-ca. 1680. Cox, Robert, d. 1655. Actæon and Diana.
The Wits, or, Sport upon sport. Part I in select pieces of drollery, digested into scenes by way of dialogue : together with variety of humors of several nations, fitted for the pleasure and content of all persons, either in court, city, countrey, or camp : the like never before published.
Printed for Henry Marsh ..., London : 1662.
mens Planets, and their good Angels and their bad. Subt. I do, if I do see 'em.— Face. VVhat! my honest Abel? thou art well met here. Drug. Troth Sir, I was speaking just as your VVorship came here, of your VVorship: I pray you speak for me to Master Doctor. Face. He shall do any thing. Doctor, do you hear? this is my friend, Abel, an honest fellow; he lets me have good Tobacco, and he does not sophisticate it with Sack-lees, or Oyl, nor washes it in Muscadel, and Grains, nor buries it in Gravel, under ground, wrapt up in greasie leather, or pist clouts, but keeps it in fine Lilie-pots, that opened, smell like Conserve of Roses, or French Beans. He has his Maple block, his silver tongs, VVinchester pipes, and fire of Juniper. A neat, spruce-honest fellow, and no Goldsmith. Subt. He is a fortunate fellow, that I am sure on. Face. Already Sir, Ha you found it? Lo thee Abel. Subt. And in right way toward riches.— Face. Sir? Subt. This Summer, he will be of the clothing of his Companie: and next Spring called to the
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A04658 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
The nevv inne. Or, The light heart A comoedy. As it was neuer acted, but most negligently play'd, by some, the Kings Seruants. And more squeamishly beheld, and censured by others, the Kings subiects. 1629. Now, at last, set at liberty to the readers, his Maties seruants, and subiects, to be iudg'd. 1631. By the author, B. Ionson.
Printed by Thomas Harper, for Thomas Alchorne, and are to be sold at his shop in Pauls Church-yeard, at the signe of the greene Dragon, London : MDCXXXI. [1631]
e Author tooke at the vulgar censure of his Play, by some malicious spectators, begat this following Ode to himselfe. COme leaue the lothed stage, And the more lothsome age: Where pride, and impudence (in faction knit) Vsurpe the chaire of wit! Indicting, and arraigning euery day Something they call a Play. Let their fastidious, vaine Commission of the braine Run on, and rage, sweat, censure, and condem'n: They were not made for thee, lesse, thou for them. Say, that thou pour'st them wheat, And they will acornes eat: 'Twere simple fury, still, thy selfe to waste On such as haue no taste! To offer them a surfet of pure bread, Whose appetites are dead! No, giue them graines their fill, Huskes, draffe to drinke, and swill. If they loue lees, and leaue the lusty wine, Enuy them not their palate's, with the swine. No doubt some mouldy tale, Like Pericles; and stale As the Shrieues custs, and nasty as his fishscraps, out euery dish, Throwne forth, and rak'tinto the common tub, May keepe vp the Play-club: There, sweepings doe as well As the be
A49533 Langbaine, Gerard, 1656-1692.
An account of the English dramatick poets, or, Some observations and remarks on the lives and writings of all those that have publish'd either comedies, tragedies, tragi-comedies, pastorals, masques, interludes, farces or opera's in the English tongue by Gerard Langbaine.; New catalogue of English plays
Printed by L.L. for George West and Henry Clements, Oxford : 1691.
at large. The just Indignation the Author took at the Vulgar Censure of his Play, begat this following Ode to himself. Come, leave the loathed Stage, And the more loathsome Age: Where Pride and Impudence (in fashion knit) Usurp the Chair of Wit! Inditing and arraigning every day Something they call a Play. Let their fastidious, vaine Commission of the Braine Run on, and rage, sweat, censure, and condemn: They were not made for thee, less thou for them. Say that thou pour'st them Wheat, And they will Acorns eat: 'Twere simple fury, still, thy self to waste On such as have no taste! To offer them a surfet of pure bread, Whose appetites are dead! No, give them Graines their fill, Husks, Draff, to drink, and swill. If they love Lees, and leave the lusty Wine, Envy them not their palate, with the Swine. No doubt some mouldy Tale, Like Pericles A Play writ by Shakespear.; and stale As the Shrieve's Crusts, and nasty as his Fish— scraps, out of every Dish, Thrown forth, and rak't into the Common-tub, May keep up the Play-Club: There, S
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A02732 Harrison, Stephen, joiner and architect. Kip, William, engraver. Dekker, Thomas, ca. 1572-1632. Magnificent entertainment. Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. B. Jon: his part of King James his royall and magnificent entertainement through his honorable cittie of London, Thurseday the 15. of March. 1603. Selections.
The arch's of triumph erected in honor of the high and mighty prince. Iames. the first of that name. King, of England. and the sixt of Scotland at his Maiesties entrance and passage through his honorable citty & chamber of London. vpon the 15th. day of march 1603. Invented and published by Stephen Harrison ioyner and architect: and graven by William Kip.
By Iohn VVindet, printer to the honourable citie of London, and are to be sold at the authors house in Lime-street, at the signe of the Snayle, [Imprinted at London : 1604]
s staine. Backe Flamin, with thy superstitious fumes, And s nse not heere; Thy ignorance presumes Too much, in acting any Ethnick rite In this translated Temple: Heere no wight, To sacrifice saue my deuotion comes, That brings in steed of those thy Masculine gummes. My Cities heart, which shall for euer burne Vpon this Altar, and no Time shall turne The same to ashes: Heere I fixe it fast, Flame bright, flame high, and may it euer last. Whilest I, before the figure of thy Peace, Still tend the fire; and giue it quicke increase With prayers, wishes, vowes; whereof be these The least, and weakest: that no Age may leese The memory of this so rich a day; But rather, that it henceforth yearely may Begin our spring, and with our spring the prime, And first account of Yeares, of Months, of Time: And may these Ides as fortunate appeare To thee, as they to Caesar fatall were. Be all thy Thoughts borne perfect, and thy Hopes In their euents still crownd beyond their scopes. Let not wide Heauen that s
A04637 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
B. Ion: his part of King Iames his royall and magnificent entertainement through his honorable cittie of London, Thurseday the 15. of March. 1603 so much as was presented in the first and last of their triumphall arch's. With his speach made to the last presentation, in the Strand, erected by the inhabitants of the Dutchy, and Westminster. Also, a briefe panegyre of his Maiesties first and well auspicated entrance to his high Court of Parliament, on Monday, the 19. of the same moneth. With other additions.
By V[alentine] S[immes and George Eld] for Edward Blount, Printed at London : 1604.
fere mas vocetur, vbi non sit femina: religioni tributum ne sexus alter vsurparetur. Masculum aliqui putant a specie testium dictum. See him also, lib. 34. cap. 11. And A nob. lib. 7. aduers. Gent. Non si mille upō dera masculi Turis ince das, &c. Masculine gummes. My Citties heart; which shall for euer burne Vpon this Altar, and no Time shall turne The same to ashes: Heere I fixe it fast, Flame bright, flame high, and may it euer last. Whilest I, before the figure of thy Peace, Still tend the fire; and giue it quick increase With praiers, wishes, vowes; whereof be these The least, and weakest: that no Age may leese The Memory of this so rich a daye; But rather, that it henceforth yearely may Begin our Spring and with our spring the prime, And According to Romulu his institution, vvho made March the first Month and consecrated it to his Father, of vvhome it vvas called Martius: Varr. Fest. in Frag. Martius mensis in tium anni fuit, et in La io, & post Romam conditam &c. And Ouid. Fast. 3.
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
ions, orders, and euents Of state, and censure them: we need his pen Can write the things, the causes, and the men. But most we need his faith (and all haue you) That dares nor write things false, nor hide things true. XCVI. TO IOHN DONNE. WHo shall doubt, DONNE, where I a Poet bee, When I dare send my Epigrammes to thee? That so alone canst iudge, so'alone dost make: And, in thy censures, euenly, dost take As free simplicitie, to dis-auow, As thou hast best authoritie, t'allow. Reade all I send: and, if I find but one Mark'd by thy hand, and with the better stone, My title's seal'd. Those that for claps doe write, Let pui'nees, porters, players praise delight, And, till they burst, their backs, like asses load: A man should seeke great glorie, and not broad. XCVII. ON THE NEW MOTION. SEe you yond' Motion? Not the old Fa-ding, Nor Captayne POD, nor yet the Eltham-thing; But one more rare, and in the case so new: His cloke with orient veluet quite lin'd through, His rosie tyes and garters so ore-blowne, By
A36301 Donne, John, 1572-1631. Mayne, Jasper, 1604-1672.
Paradoxes, problemes, essayes, characters written by Dr. Donne, dean of Pauls ; to which is added a book of epigrams ; written in Latin by the same author ; translated into English by J. Maine D.D. ; as also, Ignatius his Conclave, a satyr, translated out of the originall copy written in Latin by the same author, found lately amongst his own papers.
Printed by T.N. for Humphrey Mosely ... London : 1652.
are Statesmen most incredulous? 62 CHARACTERS. THe Character of a Scot at the first sight. 65 The true Character of a Dunce. 67 AN Essay of Valour, 72 A Sheaf of Miscellany Epigrams, 88 IGnatius nis Conclave, 107 Ben. Johnson to the Author. WHo can doubt, Donne, where I a Poet bee? When I dare send my Epigrams to thee That so alone canst judge, so alone dost make: And in thy censures, evenly, dost take As free simplicitie, to disavow, As thou hast best authority t' allow: Read all I send: and, if I finde but one Mark'd by thy hand, and with the better stone My title's seal'd. Those that for claps do write, Let punies, porters, players praise delight, And till they burst, their backs, like asses load: A man should seek great glory, and not broad. PARADOXES. I. A Defence of Womens Inconstancy. THat Women are Inconstant, I with any man confess, but that Inconstancy is a bad quality, I against any man will maintain: For every thing as it is one better than another, so is it fuller of change; The
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
ife) to the expressing of it. Would I reflect on the price? why, the whole world were but as an empire, that empire as a prouince, that prouince as a banke, that banke as a priuate purse, to the purchase of it. I will, onely, tell you; It is the poulder, that made VENVS a goddesse (giuen her by APOLLO) that kept her perpetually yong, clear'd her wrincles, firm'd her gummes, fill'd her skin, colour'd her haire; from her, deriu'd to HELEN, and at the sack of Troy (vnfortunately) lost: till now, in this our age, it was as happily recouer'd, by a studious Antiquarie, out of some ruines of Asia, who sent a moyetie of it, to the court of France (but much sophisticated) wherewith the ladies there, now, colour their haire. The rest (at this present) remaines with me; extracted, to a quintessence: so that, where euer it but touches, in youth it perpetually preserues, in age restores the complexion; seat's your teeth,
A47372 Killigrew, Thomas, 1612-1683.
Comedies and tragedies written by Thomas Killigrew ...; Works. 1664
Printed for Henry Herringman ..., London : 1664.
the expressing of it. Or if I would reflect upon the Price, why the whole world were but as an Empire, that Empire as a Province, that Province as a Bank, that Bank as a private purse, to the purchase of it. I will onely tell you; It is the very Powder that made Venus a Goddess, (given her by Apollo) that kept her perpetually young, clear'd her wrinckles, firmed her gums, filled her skin, colour'd her hair; from her derived to Helen, and at the Sack of Troy unfortunately lost, till now in this our Age it was as happily recovered by a Studious Antiquary, out of some ruines of Asia; who sent a Moyety of it to the Court of France, but much sophisticated: The rest, at this present, remains with me, extracted to a Quintescence; so that, wherever it but touches, in youth, it perpetually preserves; in Age restores the Complexion, Seats your Teeth (did they dance like Virginal Jacks) as firm as a wall, mak
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
ere! DRV. Troth, sir, I was speaking, Iust, as your worship came here, of your worship. I pray you, speake for me to master Doctor. FAC. He shall doe any thing. Doctor, doe you heare? This is my friend, ABEL, an honest fellow, He lets me haue good tabacco, and he do's not Sophisticate it, with sack-lees, or oyle, Nor washes it in muscadell, and graines, Nor buries it, in grauell, vnder ground, Wrap'd vp in greasie leather, or piss'd clouts: But keeps it in fine lilly-pots, that open'd, Smell like conserue of roses, or french beanes. He has his maple block, his siluer tongs, Winchester pipes, and fire of iuniper. A neate, spruce-honest-fellow, and no gold-smith. SVB. H'is a fortunate fellow, that I am sure on— FAC. Alreadie, sir, ha' you found it? Lo'thee ABEL! SVB. And, in right way to'ward riches— FAC. Sir. SVB. This summer, He will be of the clothing of his companie: And, next spring, call'd to the
A04636 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
The alchemist. VVritten by Ben. Ionson
Printed by Thomas Snodham, for Walter Burre, and are to be sold by Iohn Stepneth, at the west-end of Paules, London : 1612.
here. DRV. Troth, Sir, I was speaking, Iust, as your VVorship came here, of your VVorship. I pray you, speake for me to Mr. Doctor. FAC. He shall doe any thing. Doctor, doe you heare? This is my friend, Abel, an honest fellow, He lets me haue good Tobacco, and he do's not Sophisticate it, with Sack-lees, or Oyle, Nor washes it in Muscadell, and Graines, Nor buries it, in grauell, vnder ground, Wrap'd vp in greasie leather, or piss'd cloutes: But keepes it in fine Lilly-pots, that open'd, Smell like conserue of Roses, or French Beanes. He has his Maple block, his siluer tongs, Winchester pipes, and fire of Iuniper. A neate, spruce-honest-fellow, and no Goldmith. SVB. H'is a fortunate fellow, that I am sure on. FAC. Already, Sir, ha'you found it? Lo'thee Abel! SVB. And, in right way to'ward riches. FAC. Sir. SVB. This Summer. He will be of the Clothing of his company. And, next spring, call'd to the Scar
A66801unknown? Kirkman, Francis, 1632-ca. 1680. Cox, Robert, d. 1655. Actæon and Diana.
The Wits, or, Sport upon sport. Part I in select pieces of drollery, digested into scenes by way of dialogue : together with variety of humors of several nations, fitted for the pleasure and content of all persons, either in court, city, countrey, or camp : the like never before published.
Printed for Henry Marsh ..., London : 1662.
et here. Drug. Troth Sir, I was speaking just as your VVorship came here, of your VVorship: I pray you speak for me to Master Doctor. Face. He shall do any thing. Doctor, do you hear? this is my friend, Abel, an honest fellow; he lets me have good Tobacco, and he does not sophisticate it with Sack-lees, or Oyl, nor washes it in Muscadel, and Grains, nor buries it in Gravel, under ground, wrapt up in greasie leather, or pist clouts, but keeps it in fine Lilie-pots, that opened, smell like Conserve of Roses, or French Beans. He has his Maple block, his silver tongs, VVinchester pipes, and fire of Juniper. A neat, spruce-honest fellow, and no Goldsmith. Subt. He is a fortunate fellow, that I am sure on. Face. Already Sir, Ha you found it? Lo thee Abel. Subt. And in right way toward riches.— Face. Sir? Subt. This Summer, he will be of the clothing of his Companie: and next Spring called to the
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
e, A fresh applause in euerie age shall gaine. Of VARRO'S name, what eare shall not be told? Of IASONS ARGO? and the fleece of gold? Then shall LVCRETIVS loftie numbers die, When earth, and seas in fire and flames shall frie. TYTIRVS, Tillage, AENEE shall be read, Whil'st ROME of all the conquer'd world is head. Till CVPIDS fires be out, and his bowe broken, Thy verses (neate TIBVLLVS) shall be spoken. Our GALLVS shall be knowne from east to west: So shall LYCORIS, whom he now loues best. The suffering plough-share, or the flint may weare: But heauenly poesie no death can feare. Kings shall giue place to it, and kingly showes, The bankes ore which gold-bearing Tagus flowes. Kneele hindes to trash: me let bright PHOEBVS swell, With cups full flowing from the MVSES well. Frost-fearing myrtle shall impale my head, And of sad louers Ile be often read. "Enuie, the liuing, not the dead, doth bite: "For afte
A08622 Ovid, 43 B.C.-17 or 18 A.D. Marlowe, Christopher, 1564-1593. Davies, John, Sir, 1569-1626. Epigrams. aut
Ouid's elegies three bookes. By C.M. Epigrames by I.D.; Amores. English
s.n., At Middlebourgh [i.e. London : after 1602]
e, A fresh applause in euery age shall gaine, Of Varro's name, what eare shall not be told? Of Iasons Argo? and the Fleece of gold? Then, shall Lucretius lofty numbers die, VVhen Earth, and Seas in fire and flames shall frie. Titirus, Tillage, Aeney shall be read, Whil'st Rome of all the conquer'd world is head, Till Cupids fires be out, and his bow broken, Thy verses (neate Tibullus) shall be spoken. Our Gallus shall be knowne from East to west, So shall Licoris, whom he now loues best. The suffering Plough-share or the flint may weare, But heauenly Poesie no death can feare. Kings shall giue place to it, and Kingly showes, The bankes ore which gold-beating Tagus flowes. Kneele hindes to trash: me let bright Phoebus swell, With cups full flowing from the Muses well. The frost-drad mirtle shall impale my head, And of sad louers I'le be often read. Enuy the liuing, not the dead doth bite, for after d
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A02732 Harrison, Stephen, joiner and architect. Kip, William, engraver. Dekker, Thomas, ca. 1572-1632. Magnificent entertainment. Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. B. Jon: his part of King James his royall and magnificent entertainement through his honorable cittie of London, Thurseday the 15. of March. 1603. Selections.
The arch's of triumph erected in honor of the high and mighty prince. Iames. the first of that name. King, of England. and the sixt of Scotland at his Maiesties entrance and passage through his honorable citty & chamber of London. vpon the 15th. day of march 1603. Invented and published by Stephen Harrison ioyner and architect: and graven by William Kip.
By Iohn VVindet, printer to the honourable citie of London, and are to be sold at the authors house in Lime-street, at the signe of the Snayle, [Imprinted at London : 1604]
e all thy Thoughts borne perfect, and thy Hopes In their euents still crownd beyond their scopes. Let not wide Heauen that secret blessing know To giue, which she on thee will not bestow: Blind Fortune be thy slaue; and may her store (The lesse thou seest it) follow thee the more. Much more I would: but see, these brasen Gates Make hast to close, as vrged by thy Fates; Here ends my Cities office, here it breakes: Yet with my tongue, and this pure heart, she speakes A short farewell; and lower then thy feete, With feruent thankes, thy royall paines doth greete. Pardon, if my abruptnesse breed disease; He merits not t'offend, that hasts to please. Lectori Candido. READER, The limmes of these great Triumphall bodies (lately disioynted and taken in sunder) I haue thou seest (for thy sake) set in their apt and right places againe: so that now they are to stand as perpetuall monuments, not to be s
A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
hy thoughts borne perfect, and thy hopes In their euents still crown'd beyond their scopes. Let not wide heauen that secret blessing know To giue, which shee on thee will not bestow. Blind Fortune be thy slaue; and may her store (The lesse thou seek'st it) follow thee the more. Much more I would: but see, these brazen gates Make haste to close, as vrged by thy fates; Here ends my cities office, here it breakes: Yet with my tongue, and this pure heart, shee speakes A short farewell; and lower then thy feet, With feruent thankes, thy royall paynes doth greet. Pardon, if my abruptnesse breed disease; ,,He merits not t'offend, that hastes to please. Ouer the Altar was written this Inscription: D. I. O. M. BRITANNIARVM. IMP. PACIS. VINDICI. MARTE. MAIORI. P. P. F. S. AVGVSTO. NOVO. GENTIVM. CONIVNCTARVM. NVMINI. TVTELARI. D. A. CONSERVATRICI. ANNAE. IPSAE. PERENNAE. DEABVSQVE. VNIVERSIS. OPTATIOR
A04637 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
B. Ion: his part of King Iames his royall and magnificent entertainement through his honorable cittie of London, Thurseday the 15. of March. 1603 so much as was presented in the first and last of their triumphall arch's. With his speach made to the last presentation, in the Strand, erected by the inhabitants of the Dutchy, and Westminster. Also, a briefe panegyre of his Maiesties first and well auspicated entrance to his high Court of Parliament, on Monday, the 19. of the same moneth. With other additions.
By V[alentine] S[immes and George Eld] for Edward Blount, Printed at London : 1604.
thy Thoughts borne perfect, and thy Hopes In their euents still crownd beyond their scopes. Let not wide Heauen that secret blessing know To giue, which shee on thee will not bestow. Blind Fortune be thy slaue; and may her store (The lesse thou seek'st it) follow thee the more. Much more I would: but see, these brazen Gates Make hast to close, as vrged by thy Fates; Here ends my Cities office, here it breakes: Yet with my tongue, and this pure heart, she speakes A short farewell; and lower then thy feete, With feruent thankes, thy royall paines doth greete. Pardon, if my abruptnesse breed disease; He merits not t'offend, that hastes to please. Ouer the Alter was written this Inscription: D. I. O. M. BRITANNI ARVM. IMP. PACIS. VINDICI. MARTE. MAIORI. P. P. F. S. AVGVSTO. NOVO. GENTIVM. CONIVNCTARVM. NVMINI. TVTELARI. D. A. CONSERVATRICI. ANNAE. IPSAE. PERENNAE. DEABVSQVE. VNIVERSIS. OPTATIO
12: 211
A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
drunke her fill: That she no harmefull weed may know, Nor barren Ferne, nor Mandrake low, Nor Minerall to kill. The maine daunce, after which, PALLAS. But here's not all: you must doe more, Or else you doe but halfe restore The ages libertie. POETS. The male and female vs'd to ioyne, And into all delight did coyne That pure simplicitie. Then feature did to forme aduance, And youth call'd beautie forth to dance, And euerie grace was by. It was a time of no distrust, So much of loue had nought of lust, None fear'd a iealous eye. The language melted in the eare, Yet all without a blush might heare, They liu'd with open vow. QVIRE. Each touch and kisse was so well plac'd, They were as sweet as they were chast, And such must yours be now. Dance with Ladies. ASTRAEA. What change is here! I had not more Desire to leaue the earth before, Then I haue now, to stay; My siluer f
A54745 Phillips, Edward, 1630-1696?
The mysteries of love & eloquence, or, The arts of wooing and complementing as they are manag'd in the Spring Garden, Hide Park, the New Exchange, and other eminent places : a work in which is drawn to the life the deportments of the most accomplisht persons, the mode of their courtly entertainments, treatments of their ladies at balls, their accustom'd sports, drolls and fancies, the witchcrafts of their perswasive language in their approaches, or other more secret dispatches ...
Printed by James Rawlins for Obadiah Blagrave, London : 1685.
ar, And every Bramble Roses wear, And every Worm made Silk. The very Shrub did Balsom sweat, And Nectar melt the Rock with heat, And Earth did drink her fill: Then she no hurtful weed did know, Nor barren Fern, nor Mandrake low, Nor Mineral to kill. The Male and Female us'd to join, And into all delight did coin, That pure simplicity: Then Feature did to Form advance, And Youth call'd Beauty forth to dance, And every Grace was by. It was a time of no distrust, So much of Love had nought of Lust, None fear'd a jealous eye. The Language melted in the ear, Yet all without a blush might hear; They liv'd with open vow. Each touch and kiss was so well plac't, They were as sweet as they were chaste. FRom the fair Lavanion shore, I your Markets come to store; Muse not at me that so far dwell, And hither bring my Wares to sell. Such is the sacred hunger of gold, Then co
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
e west-parts, nor when that warre was done, The name of POMPEY for an enemie, CATO'S to boote, Rome, and her libertie, All yeelding to his fortune, nor, the while, To haue engrau'd these acts, with his owne stile, And that so strong and deepe, as't might be thought, He wrote, with the same spirit that he fought, Nor that his worke liu'd in the hands of foes, Vn-argued then, and yet hath fame from those; Not all these, EDMONDS, or what else put too, Can so speake CAESAR, as thy labours doe. For, where his person liu'd scarce, one iust age And that, midst enuy, and parts; then fell by rage: His deedes too dying, but in bookes (whose good How few haue read! how fewer vnderstood?) Thy learned hand, and true Promethean art (As by a new creation) part by part, In euery counsell, stratageme, designe, Action, or engine, worth a note of thine, T'all future time, no
A31706 Caesar, Julius. Edmondes, Clement, Sir, 1566 or 7-1622. Observations upon Caesars commentaries of the civil warres. Hirtius, Aulus. De bello Gallico. Liber 8. English. Edmondes, Clement, Sir, 1566 or 7-1622. Manner of our modern training or tactick practise. Caesar, Julius. De bello Gallico. English.
The commentaries of C. Julius Cæsar of his warres in Gallia, and the civil warres betwixt him and Pompey / translated into English with many excellent and judicious observations thereupon ; as also The art of our modern training, or, Tactick practise, by Clement Edmonds Esquire, ... ; where unto is adjoyned the eighth commentary of the warres in Gallia, with some short observations upon it ; together with the life of Cæsar, and an account of his medalls ; revised, corrected, and enlarged.; De bello civili. English
Printed by R. Daniel and are to be sold by Henry Tvvyford ... Nathaniel Ekins ... Iohn Place ..., London : 1655.
n theſe Weſt-parts; nor, when that warre was done, The name of Pompey for an Enemie; Cato to boot; Rome, and her libertie; All yielding to his fortune: nor, the while, To have ingrav'd theſe Acts with his own ſtile; And that ſo ſtrong, and deep, as might be thought He wrote with the ſame ſpirit that he fought; Nor that his Work liv'd, in the hands of foes, Un-argu'd then; and (yet) hath fame from thoſe: Not all theſe, Edmonds, or what elſe put to, Can ſo ſpeak Caeſar, as thy Labours do. For, where his perſon liv'd ſcarce one juſt age, And that 'midſt envy' and Parts; then, fell by rage; His deeds too dying, ſave in books: (whoſe good How few have read! how fewer underſtood!) Thy learned hand, and true Promethean Art, As by a new creation, part by part, In every counſell, ſtratageme, deſigne, Action, or Engine, worth a note of thine, T' all future time n
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
VB. 'Vmh. Free of the Grocers? DRV. I, and't please you. SVB. Well— Your businesse, ABEL? DRV. This, and't please your worship, I'am a yong beginner, and am building Of a new shop, and't like your worship; iust, At corner of a street: (Here's the plot on't.) And I would know, by art, sir, of your worship, Which way I should make my dore, by necromancie. And, where my shelues. And, which should be for boxes. And, which for pots. I would be glad to thriue, sir. And, I was wish'd to your worship, by a gentleman, One Captaine FACE, that say's you know mens planets, And their good angels, and their bad. SVB. I doe, If I doe see 'hem— FAC. What! my honest ABEL? Thou art well met, here! DRV. Troth, sir, I was speaking, Iust, as your worship came here, of your worship. I pray you, speake for me to master Doctor. FAC. He shall doe any thing. Doctor, doe you
A66801unknown? Kirkman, Francis, 1632-ca. 1680. Cox, Robert, d. 1655. Actæon and Diana.
The Wits, or, Sport upon sport. Part I in select pieces of drollery, digested into scenes by way of dialogue : together with variety of humors of several nations, fitted for the pleasure and content of all persons, either in court, city, countrey, or camp : the like never before published.
Printed for Henry Marsh ..., London : 1662.
bt. Umh. Free of the Grocers? Drug. I, an't please you. Subt. Well,—Your business, Abel? Drug. This, an't please your worship; I am a young beginner, and am building of a new Shop, an't please your Worship, just at corner of a street, (here's the plat on't) and I would know by Art, Sir, of your Worship, which way I should make my door, by Necromancie, and where my Shelves, and which should be for Boxes, and which for Pots. I would be glad to thrive, Sir: and I was wisht to your Worship, by a Gentleman, one Captain Face, that saies you know mens Planets, and their good Angels and their bad. Subt. I do, if I do see 'em.— Face. VVhat! my honest Abel? thou art well met here. Drug. Troth Sir, I was speaking just as your VVorship came here, of your VVorship: I pray you speak for me to Master Doctor. Face. He shall do any thing. Doctor, do you h
15: 198
A04651 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Vaughan, Robert, engraver.
Ben: Ionson's execration against Vulcan· VVith divers epigrams by the same author to severall noble personages in this kingdome. Never published before.; Execration against Vulcan
Printed by J. O[kes] for Iohn Benson [and A. Crooke], and are to be sold at his shop at St. Dunstans Church-yard in Fleet-streete, London : 1640.
saw a Centaure past those tales of Greece; So seem'd your Horse and You, both of a peece: You shew'd like Perseus upon Pegasus, Or Castor mounted on his Cillarus: Or what we heare our home-borne Legend tell, Of bold Sir Bevis, and his Arundell, And so your seate his beauties did endorse, As I began to wish my selfe a horse. And surely had I but your Stable seene Before, I thinke my wish absolv'd had beene: For never saw I yet the Muses dwell, Nor any of their Houshold halfe so well. So well! as when I saw the floore and roome, I look'd for Hercules to be the Groome. And cry'd away with the Caesarian Bread, At these immortall Mangers Virgil fed. B. Jonson. To William Earle of New-Castle. An Epigram on his Fencing. THey talke of Fencing, and the use of Armes, The Art of urging, and avoyding harmes; The Noble Science, and the Mastring skill, Of making
A49533 Langbaine, Gerard, 1656-1692.
An account of the English dramatick poets, or, Some observations and remarks on the lives and writings of all those that have publish'd either comedies, tragedies, tragi-comedies, pastorals, masques, interludes, farces or opera's in the English tongue by Gerard Langbaine.; New catalogue of English plays
Printed by L.L. for George West and Henry Clements, Oxford : 1691.
nd saw a Centaure past those tales of Greece, So seem'd your Horse, and you both of a piece! You shew'd like Perseus, upon Pegasus; Or Castor mounted on his Cyllarus: Or what we hear our home-born Legend tell Of bold Sir Bevis, and his Arundel: Nay, so your Seat his Beauties did endorse, As I began to wish my self a Horse: And surely had I but your Stables seen Before: I think my wish absolv'd had been. For never saw I yet the Muses dwell, Nor any of their Houshold, half so well. So well! as when I saw the Floor, and Room, I look'd for Hercules to be the Groom: And cry'd, Away with the Caesarian Breed, At these immortal Mangers Virgil fed. Margaret Dutchess of NEWCASTLE A Lady worthy the Mention and Esteem of all Lovers of Poetry and Learning. One, who was a fit Consort for so Great a Wit, as the Duke of Newcastle. Her soul sympathising with his
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A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
hose for whom they doe this, know they erre: And would (being ask'd the truth) ashamed say, They were not to be nam'd on the same day. Then stand vnto thy selfe, not seeke without For fame, with breath soone kindled, soone blowne out. CXXXII. TO Mr. IOSVAH SYLVESTER. IF to admire were to commend my praise Might then both thee, thy worke and merit raise: But, as it is (the Child of Ignorance, And vtter stranger to all ayre of France) How can I speake of thy great paines, but erre? Since they can only iudge, that can conferre. Behold! the reuerend shade of BARTAS stands Before my thought, and (in thy right) commands That to the world I publish, for him▪ this; BARTAS doth wish thy English now were his. So well in that are his inuentions wrought, As his will now be the translation thought, Thine the originall; and France shall boast, No m
A11395 Du Bartas, Guillaume de Salluste, seigneur, 1544-1590. Sylvester, Josuah, 1563-1618. Pibrac, Guy du Faur, seigneur de, 1529-1584. Quatrains. English. La Noue, Odet de, seigneur de Téligny, d. 1618. Paradoxe que les adversitez sont plus necessaires que les prosperités. English. Hudson, Thomas, 16th/17th cent. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
Du Bartas his deuine weekes and workes translated: and dedicated to the Kings most excellent Maiestie by Iosuah Syluester; Sepmaine. English
By Humfrey Lounes [and are to be sould by Arthur Iohnson at the signe of the white horse, neere the great north doore of Paules Church, Printed at London : [1611]]
as viribus ingenî Divas ruricolas ponticolas simul Vicistis, trivij meum Vicistis miserum melos. Coelum percutiat Gallia vertice, Ipsos coelicolas terra Britannica, Quae vates tulerint duos Claros prae reliquis novos. G. B. Cantabrig. EPIGRAM. To M. Iosuah Syluester. IF to admire were to commend, my Praise Might then both thee, thy work and merit raise: But, as it is (the Child of Ignorance, And vtter stranger to all ayre of France) How can I speak of thy great paines, but erre? Since they can onlie iudge, that can confer. Behold! The reuer end Shade of BARTAS stands Before my thought, ana (in thy right) commaunds That to the world I publish, for him, This; BARTAS doth wish thy English now were His. Son ell in that are his inuentions wrought, As His will now be the Translation thought, Thine the Originall; and France shall boast, No mor
17: 166
A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
ommer-nights, When youths ply their stolne delights. That the curious may not know How to tell'hem, as thy flow, And the enuious, when they find What their number is, be pin'd. VII. Song. THAT WOMEN ARE BVT MENS SHADDOWES. FOllow a shaddow, it still flies you; Seeme to flye it, it will pursue: So court a mistris, shee denyes you; Let her alone, shee will court you. Say, are not women truely, then, Stil'd but the shaddowes of vs men? At morne, and euen, shades are longest; At noone, they are or short, or none: So men at weakest, they are strongest, But grant vs perfect, they're not knowne. Say, are not women truely, then, Stil'd but the shaddowes of vs men? VIII. TO SICKNESSE. WHy, Disease, dost thou molest Ladies? and of them the best? Doe not men, ynow of rites To thy altars, by their nights Spent in surfets: and the
A28580 Bold, Henry, 1627-1683.
VVit a sporting in a pleasant grove of new fancies by H.B.
Printed for W. Burden, and are to be sold at his shop ... and by S.L. ..., London: 1657.
the name that broke the heart. Peace no more, no more you need My sad History to read. Fold the Paper up agen And report to other men, These complaints can justly prove Hearts may break that be in love. Women are mens shadows. 1. FOllow a shadow, it flies you, Seem to flie it, it will pursue. So court a Mistris, she denies you, Let her alone, she wil court you. Say, are not! women truly then Stil'd but the shadows of us men? 2. At morn and even shades are longest, At noon they are, or short or none: So men at weakest, they are strongest, But grant us perfect, th'are not known. Say are not women truly then Styl'd the shadows of us men. Women are not mens shadows. E. Contra. 1. THe Sun absented, shadows then Cease to put on the forms of men: But wives their husbands absent, may Bear best their forms (they bein
18: 164
A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
doe this, know they erre: And would (being ask'd the truth) ashamed say, They were not to be nam'd on the same day. Then stand vnto thy selfe, not seeke without For fame, with breath soone kindled, soone blowne out. CXXXII. TO Mr. IOSVAH SYLVESTER. IF to admire were to commend my praise Might then both thee, thy worke and merit raise: But, as it is (the Child of Ignorance, And vtter stranger to all ayre of France) How can I speake of thy great paines, but erre? Since they can only iudge, that can conferre. Behold! the reuerend shade of BARTAS stands Before my thought, and (in thy right) commands That to the world I publish, for him▪ this; BARTAS doth wish thy English now were his. So well in that are his inuentions wrought, As his will now be the translation thought, Thine the original
A11395 Du Bartas, Guillaume de Salluste, seigneur, 1544-1590. Sylvester, Josuah, 1563-1618. Pibrac, Guy du Faur, seigneur de, 1529-1584. Quatrains. English. La Noue, Odet de, seigneur de Téligny, d. 1618. Paradoxe que les adversitez sont plus necessaires que les prosperités. English. Hudson, Thomas, 16th/17th cent. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
Du Bartas his deuine weekes and workes translated: and dedicated to the Kings most excellent Maiestie by Iosuah Syluester; Sepmaine. English
By Humfrey Lounes [and are to be sould by Arthur Iohnson at the signe of the white horse, neere the great north doore of Paules Church, Printed at London : [1611]]
Divas ruricolas ponticolas simul Vicistis, trivij meum Vicistis miserum melos. Coelum percutiat Gallia vertice, Ipsos coelicolas terra Britannica, Quae vates tulerint duos Claros prae reliquis novos. G. B. Cantabrig. EPIGRAM. To M. Iosuah Syluester. IF to admire were to commend, my Praise Might then both thee, thy work and merit raise: But, as it is (the Child of Ignorance, And vtter stranger to all ayre of France) How can I speak of thy great paines, but erre? Since they can onlie iudge, that can confer. Behold! The reuer end Shade of BARTAS stands Before my thought, ana (in thy right) commaunds That to the world I publish, for him, This; BARTAS doth wish thy English now were His. Son ell in that are his inuentions wrought, As His will now be the Translation thought, Thine the Origina
A66698 Winstanley, William, 1628?-1698.
The lives of the most famous English poets, or, The honour of Parnassus in a brief essay of the works and writings of above two hundred of them, from the time of K. William the Conqueror to the reign of His present Majesty, King James II / written by William Winstanley, author of The English worthies ...
Printed by H. Clark for Samuel Manship ..., London : 1687.
whoſe ſix days work of Creation, gain'd him an immortal Fame, having had many great Admirers even to theſe days, being uſher'd into the world by the chiefeſt Wits of that Age; amongſt others, the moſt accompliſht Mr. Benjamin Johnſon thus wrote of him. If to admire, were to commend my Praiſe might then both thee, thy work and merit raiſe; But, as it is (the Child of Ignorance And utter ſtranger to all Ayr of France) How can I ſpeak of thy great pains, but err; Since they can only judge that can confer? Behold! the reverend ſhade of Bartus ſtands Before my thought, and (in thy right) commands That to the world I publiſh, for him, this: Bartus doth wiſh thy Engliſh now were his, So well in that are his Inventions wrought, As his will now be the Tranſlation thought, Thine the Original
19: 162
A04633 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
Bartholmew fayre : a comedie, acted in the yeare, 1614 by the Lady Elizabeths seruants, and then dedicated to King Iames, of most blessed memorie ; The diuell is an asse : a comedie acted in the yeare, 1616, by His Maiesties seruants ; The staple of newes : a comedie acted in the yeare, 1625, by His Maiesties seruants by the author, Beniamin Iohnson.; Plays. Selections
Printed by I.B. for Robert Allot, and are to be sold at the signe of the Beare, in Pauls Church-yard, London : 1631.
t keepe my purse: on, on; I pray thee, friend. NIG. But O, you vile nation of cutpurses all, Relent and repent, and amend and be sound, Edgworth gets vp to him, and tickles him in the care with a straw twice to draw his hand out of his pocket. And know that you ought not, by honest mens fall, Aduance your owne fortunes, to die aboue ground, And though you goe gay, In silkes as you may, It is not the high way to heauen, (as they say) Repent then, repent you, for better, for worse: And kisse not the Gallowes for cutting a purse. Youth, youth, thou hadst better bin steru'd by thy Nurse, Then liue to be hanged for cutting a purse. WINW. Will you see sport? looke, there's a fellow gathers vp to him, marke. QVA. Good, 'i faith ô he has lighted on the wrōg pocket. WINW. He has it, 'fore God hee is a braue fello
B01963unknown?
A caveat for cut-purses. With a warning to all purse-carriers: shewing the confidence of the first, and the carelessness of the last; with necessary admonitions for them both, lest the hangman get the one, and the begger take the other. To the tune of, Packingtons pound.
Printed for W. Gilbertson., [London] : [1663?]
tty muſt I bear the curſe, That only belong to the cunning Cut-purſe Youth youth thou hadſt better been ſtarvd by th Then live to be hang'd for cutting a pu . BVt oh! you vile Nation of Cutpurſes all, Relent and repent, and amend and be ſound And I now that you ought not by honeſt mens fall advance your own fortunes to dye above ground. And though you go gay In Silks as you may It is not the highway to Heaven as they ſay Repent then repent you for better for worſe And kiſs not the Gallows for cutting a purſe Youth youth thou hadſt better been ſtarv'd by thy Nurſe Then live to be hang'd for cutting a purſe. The Players do tell you in Bartholmew Faire what ſecret conſumptions and Raſcals you are, For one of their Actors it ſéems had the fate by ſome of your Trade to be fléeced of late, Then
20: 141
A04633 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637.
Bartholmew fayre : a comedie, acted in the yeare, 1614 by the Lady Elizabeths seruants, and then dedicated to King Iames, of most blessed memorie ; The diuell is an asse : a comedie acted in the yeare, 1616, by His Maiesties seruants ; The staple of newes : a comedie acted in the yeare, 1625, by His Maiesties seruants by the author, Beniamin Iohnson.; Plays. Selections
Printed by I.B. for Robert Allot, and are to be sold at the signe of the Beare, in Pauls Church-yard, London : 1631.
d. NIG. But O, you vile nation of cutpurses all, Relent and repent, and amend and be sound, Edgworth gets vp to him, and tickles him in the care with a straw twice to draw his hand out of his pocket. And know that you ought not, by honest mens fall, Aduance your owne fortunes, to die aboue ground, And though you goe gay, In silkes as you may, It is not the high way to heauen, (as they say) Repent then, repent you, for better, for worse: And kisse not the Gallowes for cutting a purse. Youth, youth, thou hadst better bin steru'd by thy Nurse, Then liue to be hanged for cutting a purse. WINW. Will you see sport? looke, there's a fellow gathers vp to him, marke. QVA. Good, 'i faith ô he has lighted on the wrōg pocket. WINW. He has it, 'fore God hee is a braue fello
A66741unknown? Phillips, John, 1631-1706. E. M. J. M.
Wit and drollery joviall poems / corrected and much amended, with new additions, by Sir J.M. ... Sir W.D. ... and the most refined wits of the age.
Printed for Nathanial Brook ..., London : 1661.
ace. Alack then for pity, must I bear the curse, That onely belong to the cunning Cut-purse? Youth, youth, &c. 5. But, O you vile nation of Cut-purses all, Relent and repent, and amend and be ound, And know that you ought not by honest mens fall, To advance your own fortunes, to dye above ground; And though you go gay, In Silks as you may, It is not the high-way to Heaven (as they say.) Repent then, repent you, for better, for worse, And kiss not the Gallows for cutting a purse. Youth, youth, thou hadst better been sterv'd by thy nurse, Then live to be hanged for cutting a purse. To the Tune of I wail in wo, I plunge in pain: OR LABANDOLA shot. Verse 1. IN Cheapside famous for Gold and Plate, Quicksilver I did dwell of late: I had a master good and kind, That w
B01963unknown?
A caveat for cut-purses. With a warning to all purse-carriers: shewing the confidence of the first, and the carelessness of the last; with necessary admonitions for them both, lest the hangman get the one, and the begger take the other. To the tune of, Packingtons pound.
Printed for W. Gilbertson., [London] : [1663?]
g to the cunning Cut-purſe Youth youth thou hadſt better been ſtarvd by th Then live to be hang'd for cutting a pu . BVt oh! you vile Nation of Cutpurſes all, Relent and repent, and amend and be ſound And I now that you ought not by honeſt mens fall advance your own fortunes to dye above ground. And though you go gay In Silks as you may It is not the highway to Heaven as they ſay Repent then repent you for better for worſe And kiſs not the Gallows for cutting a purſe Youth youth thou hadſt better been ſtarv'd by thy Nurſe Then live to be hang'd for cutting a purſe. The Players do tell you in Bartholmew Faire what ſecret conſumptions and Raſcals you are, For one of their Actors it ſéems had the fate by ſome of your Trade to be fléeced of late, Then
21: 136
A04632 Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637. Hole, William, d. 1624, engraver.
The workes of Beniamin Ionson; Works. Vol. 1.
Printed by W: Stansby, and are to be sould by Rich: Meighen, London : An⁰ D. 1616.
rme in, troth. KITE. The aire! shee has me i' the wind! sweet heart! Ile come to you presently: 't will away, I hope. DOW. Pray heauen it doe. KITE. A new disease? I know not, new, or old, But it may well be call'd poore mortalls plague: For, like a pestilence, it doth infect The houses of the braine. First, it begins Solely to worke vpon the phantasie, Filling her seat with such pestiferous aire, As soone corrupts the iudgement; and from thence, Sends like contag